Experience is the Difference®


Each year, millions of taxpayers claim an income tax refund. To be sure, receiving a payment from the IRS for a few thousand dollars can be a pleasant influx of cash. But it means you were essentially giving the government an interest-free loan for close to a year, which isn’t the best use of your money.

Fortunately, there is a way to begin collecting your 2017 refund now: You can review the amounts you’re having withheld and/or what estimated tax payments you’re making, and adjust them to keep more money in your pocket during the year.

Reasons to modify amounts

It’s particularly important to check your withholding and/or estimated tax payments if:

  • You received an especially large 2016 refund,
  • You’ve gotten married or divorced or added a dependent,
  • You’ve purchased a home,
  • You’ve started or lost a job, or
  • Your investment income has changed significantly.

Even if you haven’t encountered any major life changes during the past year, changes in the tax law may affect withholding levels, making it worthwhile to double-check your withholding or estimated tax payments.

Making a change

You can modify your withholding at any time during the year, or even several times within a year. To do so, you simply submit a new Form W-4 to your employer. Changes typically will go into effect several weeks after the new Form W-4 is submitted. For estimated tax payments, you can make adjustments each time quarterly payments are due.

While reducing withholdings or estimated tax payments will, indeed, put more money in your pocket now, you also need to be careful that you don’t reduce them too much. If you don’t pay enough tax during the year, you could end up owing interest and penalties when you file your return, even if you pay your outstanding tax liability by the April 2018 deadline.

If you’d like help determining what your withholding or estimated tax payments should be for the rest of the year, please contact us.

 

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Are you looking forward to your tax refund? By now you know how much you'll be getting and approximately when the cash will land in your bank account. The only question is, what's the best way to put the money to work for you?

Here are two tax-smart ideas.

Fund your IRA. Depending on your income, making a contribution to a Traditional IRA could result in a deduction on next year's tax return – and possibly a credit of as much as $2,000. For 2016, you can contribute a maximum of $5,500 to your IRA. Add another $1,000 for a total of $6,500 if you're age 50 or older.

Invest in knowledge. Establish a qualified tuition plan, commonly called a Section 529 plan, or a Coverdell Education Savings Account. While contributions are not tax-deductible, the account earnings grow tax-free, and distributions used for educational expenses are also generally tax-free.

Do you need work-related training? Education required by your employer or courses that improve or maintain skills necessary for your present job, can qualify for a deduction.

Give us a call if you would like to talk about how these options apply to your tax situation

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Tax Refund Alternative You can receive your income tax refund in several ways:

1. Direct deposit into a single checking or savings account

2. Direct deposit split into up to three different accounts in up to three different U.S. financial institutions

3. Via a paper check, or

4. Purchasing up to $5,000 U.S. Series I savings bonds. Split deposits need not be in equal amounts, though buying savings bonds must be done in multiples of $50. You can't split your refund between a direct deposit and a paper check. For direct deposits, verify that your financial institution accepts such deposits, and verify account and routing numbers.

 

 

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File folder showing the words Income TaxThere are several sources of revenue that are not subject to income tax. Here are the most common sources of money that are not taxed on your federal income tax return:

  * Borrowed money, such as from banks or personal loans.

  * Money received as a gift or inheritance from family or friends.

  * Money paid on your behalf directly to a school or medical facility.

  * Most life insurance proceeds.

  * Cash rebates from businesses when you buy an item.

  * Child support payments.

  * Money you receive for sustaining an injury.

  * Scholarships for tuition and books.

  * Disability insurance proceeds from a policy purchased with after-tax dollars.

  * Up to $500,000 of profit for a married couple selling their personal residence.

  * Interest received on municipal bonds.

If you have included any of these as taxable income on your income tax return for the past three years, you can amend your return for a tax refund.

If you would like assistance in determining what to include on your income tax return, please contact us. We are here to help you

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Experience is the Difference®

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