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The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) has clarified its guidance on pro forma compilations. Here’s an explanation of when the new Statement on Standards for Accounting and Review Services (SSARS) applies and what your CPA now expects from you when performing these nontraditional attestation services. 

Overview

SSARS 22 applies when an accountant has been engaged to perform a compilation engagement on pro forma financial information. Unlike forecasts or projections that reflect prospective financial results, pro forma financial information shows what the historical financial statements would have looked like had a transaction or event — such as a business combination, disposition of a business line or change in capitalization — occurred at an earlier date. 

The new guidance explains that a compilation engagement on pro forma financial information is often undertaken as a separate engagement. But it can also be done in conjunction with a compilation, a review or an audit of financial statements. 

Expectations for clients

When compiling pro forma statements, what do we expect from you? Under SSARS 22, the company’s management must 1) provide written acknowledgment that it accepts full responsibility for the preparation and fair presentation of the pro forma financial information in accordance with the applicable financial reporting framework, and 2) include (or make readily available) the following in any document containing the pro forma financial information:

  • Your company’s financial statements for the most recent year,
  • A summary of significant assumptions,
  • Interim period historical financial information, if interim period pro forma financial information is presented, and
  • In the case of a business combination, the relevant historical financial information for the significant constituent parts of the combined entity.

Financial statements and historical interim financial information are deemed to be “readily available” if a third party can obtain them without any further action by the entity. For example, historical interim financial information on a company’s website may be considered readily available. However, information that’s available upon request isn’t considered readily available.

Additionally, pro forma financial information must be based on historical financial statements that have been compiled, reviewed or audited. Moreover, the new standard requires you to ask your CPA for permission before including the compilation report in any document containing pro forma financial information that indicates that a compilation has been performed on such information. 

Up and running

SSARS 22 is effective for compilation reports on pro forma financial information dated on or after May 1, 2017. We understand these fundamental changes and have updated our practices to comply with the new guidance. Contact us for help compiling your pro formas.

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All charitable donations aren’t created equal — some provide larger deductions than others. And it isn’t necessarily just how much or even what you donate that matters. How the charity uses your donation might also affect your deduction. 

Take vehicle donations, for example. If you donate your vehicle, the value of your deduction can vary greatly depending on what the charity does with it. 

Determining your deduction

You can deduct the vehicle’s fair market value (FMV) if the charity:

  • Uses the vehicle for a significant charitable purpose (such as delivering meals-on-wheels to the elderly),
  • Sells the vehicle for substantially less than FMV in furtherance of a charitable purpose (such as a sale to a low-income person needing transportation), or
  • Makes “material improvements” to the vehicle.

But in most other circumstances, if the charity sells the vehicle, your deduction is limited to the amount of the sales proceeds. 

Getting proper substantiation

You also must obtain proper substantiation from the charity, including a written acknowledgment that:

  • Certifies whether the charity sold the vehicle or retained it for use for a charitable purpose,
  •  Includes your name and tax identification number and the vehicle identification number, and
  • Reports, if applicable, details concerning the sale of the vehicle within 30 days of the sale.

For more information on these and other rules that apply to vehicle donation deductions — or deductions for other charitable gifts — please contact us. 

 

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If you’re interested in lending money to your children or other family members, consider establishing a “family bank.” These entities enhance the benefits of intrafamily loans, while minimizing unintended consequences.

Upsides and downsides of intrafamily lending

Lending can be an effective way to provide your family financial assistance without triggering unwanted gift taxes. So long as a loan is structured in a manner similar to an arm’s-length loan between unrelated parties, it won’t be treated as a taxable gift. This means, among other things:

  • Documenting the loan with a promissory note,
  • Charging interest at or above the applicable federal rate,
  • Establishing a fixed repayment schedule, and
  • Ensuring that the borrower has a reasonable prospect of repaying the loan.

Even if taxes aren’t a concern, intrafamily loans offer important benefits. For example, they allow you to help your family financially without depleting your wealth or creating a sense of entitlement. Done right, these loans can promote accountability and help cultivate the younger generation’s entrepreneurial capabilities by providing financing to start a business.

Too often, however, people lend money to family members with little planning and regard for potential unintended consequences. Rash lending decisions can lead to misunderstandings, hurt feelings, conflicts among family members and false expectations. That’s where the family bank comes into play.

Make loans through a family bank

A family bank is a family-owned, family-funded entity — such as a dynasty trust, a family limited partnership or a combination of the two — designed for the sole purpose of making intrafamily loans. Often, family banks are able to make financing available to family members who might have difficulty obtaining a loan from a bank or other traditional funding sources or to lend at more favorable terms.

By “professionalizing” family lending activities, a family bank can preserve the tax-saving power of intrafamily loans while minimizing negative consequences. The key to avoiding family conflicts and resentment is to build a strong family governance structure that promotes communication, group decision making and transparency. 

Establishing clear guidelines regarding the types of loans the family bank is authorized to make — and allowing all family members to participate in the decision-making process — ensures that family members are treated fairly and avoids false expectations.

Contact us to learn more about the ins and outs of intrafamily lending.

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In today’s competitive environment, offering employees an equity interest in your business can be a powerful tool for attracting, retaining and motivating quality talent. If your business is organized as a partnership, however, there are some tax traps you should watch out for. Once an employee becomes a partner, you generally can no longer treat him or her as an employee for tax and benefits purposes, which has significant tax implications.

Employment taxes

Employees pay half of the Social Security and Medicare taxes on their wages, through withholdings from their paychecks. The employer pays the other half. Partners, on the other hand, are treated as being self-employed — they pay the full amount of “self-employment” taxes through quarterly estimates.

Often, when employees receive partnership interests, the partnership continues to treat them as employees for tax purposes, withholding employment taxes from their wages and paying the employer’s share. The problem with this practice is that, because a partner is responsible for the full amount of employment taxes, the partnership’s payment of a portion of those taxes will likely be treated as a guaranteed payment to the partner. 

That payment would then be included in income and trigger additional employment taxes. Any employment taxes not paid by the partnership on a partner’s behalf are the partner’s responsibility.

Treating a partner as an employee can also result in overpayment of employment taxes. Suppose your partnership pays half of a partner’s employment taxes and the partner also has other self-employment activities — for example, interests in other partnerships or sole proprietorships. If those activities generate losses, the losses will offset the partner’s earnings from your partnership, reducing or even eliminating self-employment taxes.

Employee benefits

Partners and employees are treated differently for purposes of many benefit plans. For example, employees are entitled to exclude the value of certain employer-provided health, welfare and fringe benefits from income, while partners must include the value in their income (although they may be entitled to a self-employed health insurance deduction). And partners are prohibited from participating in a cafeteria plan.

Continuing to treat a partner as an employee for benefits purposes may trigger unwanted tax consequences. And it could disqualify a cafeteria plan.

Partnership alternatives

There are techniques that allow you to continue treating newly minted partners as employees for tax and benefits purposes. For example, you might create a tiered partnership structure and offer employees of a lower-tier partnership interests in an upper-tier partnership. Because these employees aren’t partners in the partnership that employs them, many of the problems discussed above will be avoided. 

If your business is contemplating offering partnership interests to key employees, contact us for more information about the potential tax consequences and how to avoid any pitfalls.

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Many not-for-profit youth sports leagues are at risk for fraud and don’t even know it. Because cash transactions are common and leagues usually are managed by volunteers with little oversight, it’s easy for crooked individuals to take advantage of the situation. Unfortunately, sports league fraud is usually committed by board members or officers who are well known and respected in their communities. How then can your league prevent this crime?

Simple steps

By far the most important step you can take is to segregate duties. This means that no single individual receives, records and deposits funds coming in, pays bills and reconciles bank statements. Assign someone uninvolved in handling deposits and payments to receive and reconcile the bank statement. A different person should monitor the budget, and every payment (or at least payments over a certain threshold) should require two signatures. If your league has credit or debit cards, ask someone who isn’t an authorized user to review the statements.

Also, your league should:

Mandate board review. Your board of directors should receive and review financial reports on a quarterly or monthly basis — including when the league isn’t in season. The treasurer should submit a report for every board meeting, with bank statements attached.

Require online registration and payment. A lot of leagues still use paper registrations and accept payment by cash or check. Cash can be pocketed in the blink of an eye, and checks can be diverted to thieves’ own accounts. But with online registration, payments are deposited directly into the league’s account.

Rotate treasurers. Treasurers are the most likely youth sports league officials to commit fraud because they have the easiest access to funds and the ability to cover their tracks. Make sure no one person stays in the treasurer position for more than a couple of years. If funds are available, consider hiring a part-time bookkeeper who will report directly to your board.

Not all fun and games

Many youth sports leagues are ripe for fraud, in large part because of their lack of formality and their environment of trust. Structure may seem counter to the spirit of amateur leagues, but if your group doesn’t adopt some smart business practices, it could end up out of business. Contact us for more information.

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Every company has at least one owner. And, in many cases, there exists leadership down through the organizational chart. But not every business has strong governance.

In a nutshell, governance is the set of rules, practices and processes by which a company is directed and controlled. Strengthening it can help ensure productivity, reduce legal risks and, when the time comes, ease ownership transitions.

Looking at business structure

Good governance starts with the initial organization (or reorganization) of a business. Corporations, for example, are required by law to have a board of directors and officers and to observe certain other formalities. So this entity type is a good place to explore the concept.

Other business structures, such as partnerships and limited liability companies (LLCs), have greater flexibility in designing their management and ownership structures. But these entities can achieve strong governance with well-designed partnership or LLC operating agreements and a centralized management structure. They might, for instance, establish management committees that exercise powers similar to those of a corporate board.

Specifying the issues

For the sake of simplicity, however, let’s focus on governance issues in the context of a corporation. In this case, the business’s articles of incorporation and bylaws lay the foundation for future governance. The organizational documents might:

  • • Define and limit the authority of each executive,
  • • Establish a board of directors,
  • • Require board approval of certain actions,
  • • Authorize the board to hire, evaluate, promote and fire executives based on merit,
  • • Authorize the board to determine the compensation of top executives and to approve the terms of employment agreements, and
  • • Create nonvoting classes of stock to provide equity to the owner’s family members who aren’t active in the business, but without conferring management control.


As you look over this list, consider whether and how any of these items might pertain to your company. There are, of course, other aspects to governance, such as establishing an ethics code and setting up protocols for information technology.

Knowing yourself

At the end of the day, strong governance is all about knowing your company and identifying the best ways to oversee its smooth and professional operation. Please contact our firm for help running a profitable, secure business.

 

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A potential downside of tax-deferred saving through a traditional retirement plan is that you’ll have to pay taxes when you make withdrawals at retirement. Roth plans, on the other hand, allow tax-free distributions; the tradeoff is that contributions to these plans don’t reduce your current-year taxable income. 

Unfortunately, your employer might not offer a Roth 401(k) or another Roth option, and modified adjusted gross income (MAGI)-based phaseouts may reduce or eliminate your ability to contribute to a Roth IRA. Fortunately, there is a solution: the “back door” Roth IRA.

Are you phased out?

The 2017 contribution limit for all IRAs combined is $5,500 (plus an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution if you’ll be age 50 or older by December 31). You can make a partial contribution if your MAGI falls within the applicable phaseout range, but no contribution if it exceeds the top of the range:

  • For married taxpayers filing jointly: $186,000–$196,000.
  • For single and head-of-household taxpayers: $118,000–$133,000.

(Note: Married taxpayers filing separately are subject to much lower phaseout ranges.)

Using the back door

If the income-based phaseout prevents you from making Roth IRA contributions and you don’t already have a traditional IRA, a “back door” IRA might be right for you. 

How does it work? You set up a traditional account and make a nondeductible contribution to it. You then wait until the transaction clears and convert the traditional account to a Roth account. The only tax due will be on any growth in the account between the time you made the contribution and the date of conversion, which should be little, if any, assuming you’re able to make the conversion quickly.

More limited tax benefit in some cases

If you do already have a traditional IRA, the back-door Roth IRA strategy is still available but there will be more tax liability on the conversion. A portion of the amount you convert to a Roth IRA will be considered attributable to deductible contributions and thus be taxable. It doesn’t matter if you set up a new traditional IRA for the nondeductible contributions; all of your traditional IRAs will be treated as one for tax purposes. 

Roth IRAs have other benefits and downsides you need to factor into your decision, and additional rules apply to IRA conversions. Please contact us for assistance in determining whether a backdoor Roth IRA is right for you.

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Think the rules for reporting employee stock options and restricted stock are too complicated? The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) agrees — and it has simplified the rules starting in 2017 for public companies and 2018 for private companies. Here’s how. 

Old rules

Under current U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), for each share-based payment, employers must determine whether the difference between the deduction for tax purposes and the compensation cost recognized for financial reporting purposes results in either an excess tax benefit or a tax deficiency. 

Currently, when the deduction for a share-based payment for income tax purposes exceeds the compensation cost for accounting purposes, the employer recognizes an excess tax benefit in additional paid-in capital, which is an equity account on the balance sheet. Conversely, tax deficiencies are recognized either as an offset to accumulated excess tax benefits, if any, or in the income statement. Excess tax benefits aren’t recognized until the deduction reduces taxes payable.

New rules

Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2016-09, Compensation — Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, moves all accounting for income tax consequences of share-based payments to the income statement. Under the simplified rules:

  • All excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies will be recognized as income tax expense or benefit,
  • The tax effects of exercised or vested awards will be treated as discrete items in the reporting Employers will recognize excess tax benefits regardless of whether the benefit reduces taxes payable in the current period.

The new standard also calls for excess tax benefits to be classified on the statement of cash flows as an operating activity with other income tax cash flows. Under current GAAP, employers are required to separate excess tax benefits from other income tax cash flows and classify them as financing activities. 

Alternative for private companies

Many people forget that private companies also may award stock options and restricted shares to employees. However, it’s more challenging to value share-based awards for private companies, because their shares don’t trade in the public markets. 

The updated guidance provides a simplified formula for estimating the expected term for nonpublic entities that issue share-based payments based on a service or performance condition. Under this optional practical expedient, the expected term of a share-based payment will generally be the midpoint between the requisite service period and the contractual term of the award, if vesting is dependent only on a service condition. That formula also applies if the award is dependent on satisfying a performance condition that’s probable of being achieved.

Right for you?

Share-based payments can be an effective way for cash-strapped businesses to attract and retain executives. But the existing accounting rules have discouraged some companies from trying out employee stock options and restricted stock in their compensation plans. With simplification efforts in effect, it’s easier than ever to report these transactions. Contact us to discuss whether share-based payments could work for your company. 

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The IRS announced that it will begin conducting examinations with a new pilot program. The “IRS Taxpayer Digital Communications Secure Messaging” program is designed to save time and costs by reducing paper mail and phone correspondence. The IRS plans to invite 8,000 taxpayers who are currently undergoing correspondence examinations to participate. Tax preparers who have valid powers of attorney can also take part if their clients receive letters confirming eligibility. Taxpayers will register, communicate and transfer documents using Internet-based channels. 

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